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November 26, 2015
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What's New at 144
Brady for Senate


Thu Oct 29 2015 - In The News

Michael Brady is the Democratic candidate running for the 2nd Plymouth & Bristol state Senate seat held by the late Democratic Sen. Thomas Kennedy who died in June.

The Brockton resident has been a state representative since 2009 and a member of the Massachusetts State Democratic Committee member for the past 10 years.

Prior to his election to the Statehouse, Brady served on the Brockton School Committee, Ward 2, from 1996 to 1997 and on the Brockton City Council, Ward 2, from 1997 to 2009.

Brady attended Massasoit Community College and is a 1980 graduate of Brockton High School.

What do you see as the three top issues for Easton voters?

I believe that, as a town, Easton has always shown a strong commitment to and investment in the people of the town. As a member of the Ways and Means Committee, I have successfully worked hard to increase funding for local aid. This is key to make investments in our schools and roadways. We must continue our efforts to combat the opiate abuse epidemic - a problem that exists and impacts every city and town in the Commonwealth. At the same time, we must address and increase access to care for mental health. Unfortunately, many of our veterans are dealing with addiction and mental health issues. We cannot let those who have served fall through the cracks.

I believe that public safety is always a concern for the people of Easton. As vice -chair of the Committee on Public Safety, I worked closely with our police and fire to support funding for police and fire departments.

Easton is a small part of this large district. How will you make sure you are meeting Easton voters’ needs? Describe any time you have spent during your campaign in Easton.

I have spent a considerable amount of time in Easton, long before this campaign began. I enjoy supporting many of the fine eating establishments in Easton. I have supported many of the local charities and groups for years. I am looking forward to the further revitalization of the downtown.

I have always been proud of my commitment to serving constituents, and I would continue this strong commitment moving forward. As a state representative, my constituents know that my phone is always on and that I am always accessible. I’ve campaigned throughout the entire district, making sure to visit and engage with voters in every town and city within. From knocking on countless doors in Easton, to visiting with seniors at Queset on the Pond, to attending a benefit for a family who tragically lost their son to a heroin overdose, I’ve been inspired by the conversations I’ve had with Easton residents. As state senator, I pledge to continue my commitment to being present and visible liaison to the Easton community.

Why are you running for this seat?

I am deeply invested in this district, and my greatest passion is service. I take great pride in my ability to help people as a legislator. Each opportunity to do so inspires me to work even harder the next day with a dedication fueled by an understanding that we, as elected officials, can have a direct and immediate impact to make someone’s life better. I understand the challenges faced by the people here, and have worked closely with the elected officials and community advocates across the district. I would be honored to continue the legacy of my friend, Senator Tom Kennedy.

97th Anniversary of Brockton Firefighters Union Local 144

Brockton Firefighters IAFF Local 144 was chartered on November 25th 1918

Firefighter cancer rates should spur further action

Firefighter cancer rates should spur further action

An analysis of the health records of nearly 30,000 firefighters in three major American cities reaffirmed the conclusions of numerous smaller studies — professional firefighters have higher incidences of many cancers than the general population.

At this point the evidence seems incontrovertible.

"Compared with the U.S. population, we found small to moderate increases in risk for several cancer sites and for all cancers combined, stemming mostly from excess malignancies of the respiratory, digestive and urinary systems in otherwise healthy individuals," reports the Center for Disease Control's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, in a study released in October. "Our findings are consistent with previous studies and strengthen evidence of a relation between firefighters' occupational exposure and cancer."

The study also found a strong link between firefighter exposure to asbestos and malignant mesothelioma.

"Given that asbestos is the only known causal agent for malignant mesothelioma, and firefighter exposures are probable, the excess is likely to be a causal association."

Since we accept the scientific findings linking firefighting to increased cancer risk, and since we highly value the service firefighters provide our communities, we accept that society has a responsibility to help firefighters mitigate the risk and, when cancer is diagnosed, to help firefighters and their families deal with it in the best way possible.

Mitigation, we expect, will prove less complicated than remediation.

Last Sunday we reported on local cancer risk mitigation efforts being led by Portsmouth Fire Lt. Russ Osgood and Dave Lang at the Professional Fire Fighters Association.

Osgood became passionate about firefighter cancer risk after seeing two of his colleagues, Sarah Fox and Jeff Bokum, die from cancer in 2011 and 2012. Now he is working with others in the state to educate firefighters about proper use of protective gear and the need to thoroughly wash after exposure to toxic chemicals at a fire scene. He notes that firefighters have no idea what toxins they're exposed to during a fire.

"You have no idea — maybe it's a meth lab, maybe it's a bunch of computers burning, you never know," he told Seacoast Sunday. "A car fire is a toxic soup. You've got rubber and plastic and foam and all that stuff burning. You see that heavy black smoke — well that smoke is unburned product."

"The reality is guys are going to get cancer and you've got to support them," Osgood said.

In 1987, the New Hampshire Legislature passed a law that presumed for the purpose of worker's compensation that all firefighter cancers were work related. That law was later found to be unconstitutional because it was an unfunded mandate. Now, in an attempt to help the law pass constitutional muster, Portsmouth state Rep. Laura Pantelakos intends to submit a bill for this legislative session to fully fund worker's compensation for firefighters with cancer.

While we agree with the intent of Pantelakos' bill, we certainly think the state owes it to taxpayers to assess the full costs of such a program to determine whether or not it is financially feasible. Exactly which firefighters would qualify and under which specific circumstances would need to be clearly spelled out. The success or failure of such a bill will be in its details.

If enhanced worker's compensation proves impractical we strongly urge Pantelakos and her legislative colleagues to explore other means of providing financial protection to the men and women in our fire departments who provide such a vital and often life-saving service to our communities.

Kids Christmas Party 2013

The Kid's Christmas Party Committee would like to thank all the members and family that helped in a successful day.  

Happy Holidays

The Plot Against Pensions
Brockton Firefighters Local 144
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